Reading Logs

Ah, the dreaded question…how do we keep students accountable for independent reading? Do we record number of pages read, amount of time spent reading, types of genres explored? Do we require students to summarize reading, have parents sign off, or answer generic questions about their reading? We all know how important daily reading is for students to develop good language, vocabulary, reading comprehension, decoding, and writing skills. Daily reading improves all areas of learning by expanding background knowledge, vocabulary, exposure to sentences structures and imagination (a.k.a. critical thinking). reading english

My school’s policy is for students to read 20 minutes every day a minimum of 5 days a week. However, there are only 2 teachers I know of who actually monitor this required reading. Last year, I attempted to institute a reading log to monitor students reading in my own classroom. I decided to go with an evidence of comprehension model as opposed to a time or pages record. I was sorely disappointed with the results.

My goal was to get students to think beyond just telling the events that happened in their 20 minutes of reading. I wanted them to think about what they had read and the process of reading itself. Despite repeated modeling, whole-class and small-group correcting, and explicit sentence stems and group reading log writing sessions, I was never able to get my students beyond the point of summarizing what they read, if they even understood what they were reading well enough to be able to summarize what happened in the first place.

Here is what I gave them to glue into their composition bound reading log as reference: read_log_and_rubric I found it for free on Teachers Pay Teachers and modified it to meet my students’ needs. I no longer remember who sold this product. If you recognize it please let me know so that I may give the correct person credit for this great resource.

Despite being a few weeks into the current school year, I am still not sure what I am going to do for reading logs. Any suggestions? I may just repeat what I did last year and continue trying to model and correct. Maybe they will eventually build up the higher level skills?

Extended School Year Lessons

Well we are half way through summer now and deep into ESY. As a special education teacher with a high-need skill, my contract has me on call for the extended school year (summer school for special ed), and every year, I’ve been called in.

I love it though, especially now as a classroom teacher during the regular nine month school year. ESY gives me a break in routine and lets me return to my itinerant roots, traveling to my students to work with them one on one on high need, functional skills: language and auditory training without worry for content knowledge like social studies and science. It’s a much more relaxing environment for me since there’s no curriculum pacing guide we have to rush to keep up with.

I try to make sure that is also a break for the students, too. It is summer after all, and none of them are happy to be one of the few who gets pulled from camp by their school teacher or, worse, has their teacher visit them at their house!

Here are some ways I try to make ESY lessons fun:

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  • Go on a vocabulary scavenger hunt. This one requires you plan in advance and are familiar with hte environment. I will sometimes have students meet me at the public library or my school classroom, and this is one of my go to lessons for those settings. It’s pretty straightforward and real simple to prep. Give students a list of the vocabulary they are learning. They then have to find examples of those words in the room (or building or yard). Just make sure there is at least one item that would fit each word. This works best for nouns and some adjectives. Verbs and adverbs are tricky as there’s no guarantee someone will be doing something to fit the word. I have let students act out these words before, though, so if you really want to include them you can with a that minor modification.

http://www.schooltechnology.org Photos of elementary students using iPads at school to do amazing projects.

  • Bring in the iPad! I have a personal iPad, and my summer students consider this the most sacred of rewards. Originally, I thought I would use the iPad in my classroom, but after our school iPad was broken by an overly excited student who forgot to put the iPad down before she started signing about her game score, I removed my personal iPad from the classroom. It’s too expensive a device to risk. However, I do bring it out during ESY. It’s a more supervised, one-on-one environment, so the risk is reduced, and the motivation and feeling of exclusivity for the students makes the risk worth it. For every 1 paper activity my students complete without complaint, they get to complete 1 round of 1 educational game on the iPad. They will do just about anything willingly to get that iPad access. We also usually write our own kid’s book using different iPad apps as a summer-long project. I publish the books and include them in our class library during the school year, so student has something to show off to the other students who didn’t have ESY.

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  • Read outside. A change of scenery can make a world of difference. If a student is getting fidgety, I’ll let them pick a book, and we’ll go outside to read. This is my tricky way of testing auditory reception. We sit side by side, and I read aloud. (Sometimes I will let a sibling read aloud if they are available and willing.) At random moments, I stop and ask the student to point to the last word read. We tally how many times they get it correct, and if they beat their record from the earlier times, they’re rewarded. This activity requires them to pay constant attention, but it also lets me check how well they can follow auditory input in an uncontrolled environment with a variety of background noises, not to mention that we get to be outdoors and get some sun on a pretty day. 😉
  • Sound classification outside Speaking of all the outdoor noise, another great activity I use with my newly hearing or younger ESY students was dubbed Summer Sound Sorting (by a student who had just learned the word “alliteration”). This can be a relaxing activity for a student who is feeling frustrated with other work, but be aware it may be very difficult with student with severe hearing loss or who have been recently aided/implanted. We go outside and be as quiet as possible. The student has to try to name each sound they hear. Is it a bird? A lawn mower? A car? Was that the wind or a person? Sometimes, we’ll take the iPad out to record all the sounds to review later. One student made a sound book with audio clips for his summer book project.

music

  • Popular Songs During the school year, I have students bring in songs they want me to cue and/or explain for them. I’ve started requiring this of my ESY students. Each session they have to bring in a song them like (parent responsibility to check for appropriateness), and we go over the vocabulary, idioms, and figurative language that comes up. My students love it! I love it too, because it gets them listening to music more and gives them something to talk about with their chronological age peers. Often, my students get left out of many social conversation about bands and top songs, but this helps keep them in the loop. We even work on singing along!

conversation beech ball

  • Keep it active! For most ESY activities, I try to make sure the student is moving. Even just a little movement can go a long way. Instead of a matching worksheet, we’ll use flashcards and really spread them out. We will act out books instead of write summaries (although they may have to write the script for us to act it!). Thanks to this inspiring blog post, I also have a beach ball that I wrote conversation topics on. We toss it back and forth; whichever topic our left thumb lands on, we talk about for a minimum of 3 minutes and no less than 3 student sentences. Anything to get them moving will help keep your students engaged when they’d rather be playing.

So how about you guys? Do you have any great summer therapy or ESY lessons? How do you make summer learning more fun for your students?

Teacher Summer Bucket List

Summer has arrived! I’m excited for the change in routine and the chance to work with my students one-on-one specifically on their language and hearing needs without concern for curriculum content. Yes, that’s right; it’s summer, and I will still be working with my students.

Contrary to popular belief, teachers are still working even when the schools are out of session. Even if you don’t have a formal extended school year program, like I do, I’m sure your classroom is somehow on your mind. There’s lesson plans to be improved, curriculum to be updated, professional development to attend… If our summer break includes a vacation it is probably no longer than what would be given in any other profession.

Every summer I always have a ton of projects and intentions for all of the “extra time” I will have on my hands. Some years, I am better at checking off all to do’s than others. One of my transliterators suggested I make a summer bucket list to help keep myself on track this year, and I’m excited to share that with you here.

Teacher-y Bucket List

  • 40 hours itinerant Extended School Year
  • Summer Academy PD workshops (We’re moving to the Stetson inclusion model; has anyone tried that?)
  • teach parent and student ASL classes
  • plan daily math centers with independent, hands-on activities (any suggestions would be most appreciated)
  • select class novel and write reading guide and lesson plans
  • get TESOL certification (45% of my students this year were ELLs.)
  • improve Cued Speech fluency
  • develop way to integrate Cued Speech reading instruction (Any ideas? My students are not fluent cue readers, but it is their primary (if not only) communication modality; we need some serious improvements!)
  • make conversation sentence stem cards to help with language samples and class discussions

Non-Teacher-y Bucket List

 

  • Italy trip
  • Colorado wedding road trip
  • visit college friends (Atlanta, Virginia, Nashville)
  • sew travel kit accessories (I found these ideas here, here, and decided to make my own version of this item here.)
  • sew placemats (Can you tell I like to sew?)
  • knit sheep baby blanket (idea found here)
  • finish mug storage (another fun Pinterest project idea)

Reading Bucket List

  • I Can Hear You Whisper: An Intimate Journey Through the Science of Sound and Language  by Lydia Denworth
  • Talking Hands by Margalit Fox
  • When the Brain Can’t Hear: Unraveling the Mystery of Auditory Processing Disorder by Dr. Teri James Bellis, Ph.D.
  • Building Academic Language: Essential Practices for Content Classrooms by Jeff Zwiers
  • The Lady in Gold by Anne-Marie O’Connor (not teaching or Deaf related, but you gotta have some fun reading, right?)

I don’t know that I will get everything done before the end of summer, but I am hoping to finish a good bit and maybe do a few things more for my classroom and lesson planning as inspiration hits. Do you make a summer bucket list? What do you put on your list?

Deaf Literature in the Classroom

I love reading books about Deaf characters. The number of books that somehow incorporate hearing loss are surprising. It is somehow both more than I expected and less than I expected. I am amazed by the Deaf characters in the sidelines of not-as-popular novels by classic authors: Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Lew Wallace, Brian Selznick… (Okay, maybe that last one isn’t a traditional classic author, but he’s certainly a contemporary classic in our classrooms!)

I am always amazed that my students have often never read books containing Deaf characters. If they have, it’s usually children’s books about how it’s okay to be different or trying to encourage our DHH kiddos to wear their hearing aids. I don’t consider these genuine novels, because the whole focus of the story is meant to discuss hearing loss. The books I love are the ones where there just happens to be a Deaf individual appearing, or featured in the story. The author doesn’t make a big deal out of teaching the reader to accept their own hearing loss or that of their classmates. The point isn’t to preach but to entertain.

Do you use books with Deaf characters with your students? I always strive to include these genuine examples of Deaf characters in my literature curriculum. I believe all readers are seeking images of themselves within the pages of what they read. Our students deserve characters that can provide this self-connection.

Here are some of my favorite links to lists of books featuring Deaf characters:

This is certainly not all inclusive. I hope to begin my own list through this blog and would like to feature reviews of some of these books. Are there any you would like to know more about? Please comment with requests for reviews or for titles that meet any criteria you may have in looking for a book. Thanks!